Machu Picchu’s Servants Hailed From Distant Lands Conquered by the Incas, Genetic Study Finds

A new genetic study has found that the servants who built and maintained Machu Picchu hailed from distant lands conquered by the Incas. The study, which was published in the journal Nature, analyzed the DNA of 20 individuals who were buried in the ruins of Machu Picchu. The results showed that the servants came from a variety of different regions, including the Andes Mountains, the Amazon rainforest, and even the coast of Peru.

The study’s findings suggest that the Incas forcibly relocated people from conquered territories to Machu Picchu to serve as laborers and craftsmen. This practice, known as mit’a, was common throughout the Inca empire. It was a way for the Incas to consolidate their power and control over their subjects.

The study also found that the servants who built Machu Picchu were relatively young when they died. The average age at death was just 25 years old. This suggests that the work at Machu Picchu was very demanding and that the servants often died young.

The study’s findings shed new light on the history of Machu Picchu and the Inca empire. They show that the Incas were a powerful and sophisticated civilization that was able to control a vast territory. They also show that the Incas were willing to use force to achieve their goals.

Here are some additional details about the study:

  • The study was conducted by researchers from the University of California, Davis, and the University of Oxford.
  • The researchers analyzed the DNA of 20 individuals who were buried in the ruins of Machu Picchu.
  • The results showed that the servants came from a variety of different regions, including the Andes Mountains, the Amazon rainforest, and even the coast of Peru.
  • The study’s findings suggest that the Incas forcibly relocated people from conquered territories to Machu Picchu to serve as laborers and craftsmen.
  • The study also found that the servants who built Machu Picchu were relatively young when they died. The average age at death was just 25 years old.

Here are some frequently asked questions about the study:

  • Why did the Incas build Machu Picchu?

The Incas built Machu Picchu for a variety of reasons. It was a royal estate for the Inca emperor, Pachacuti. It was also a religious center and a military stronghold.

  • Why did the Incas forcibly relocate people to Machu Picchu?

The Incas forcibly relocated people to Machu Picchu to serve as laborers and craftsmen. They also wanted to control the population and prevent rebellions.

  • How did the servants who built Machu Picchu die?

The servants who built Machu Picchu died from a variety of causes, including disease, accidents, and violence. The average age at death was just 25 years old.

  • What does the study’s findings mean for our understanding of the Inca empire?

The study’s findings show that the Incas were a powerful and sophisticated civilization that was able to control a vast territory. They also show that the Incas were willing to use force to achieve their goals.

  • What are the next steps for research on Machu Picchu?

The next steps for research on Machu Picchu are to continue to study the ruins and to learn more about the people who built and lived there. Researchers are also interested in exploring the surrounding area to see if there are other Inca ruins that have yet to be discovered.

Conclusion

The study of Machu Picchu is ongoing, and there is still much that we don’t know about the site. However, the research that has been conducted so far has shed new light on the history of the Inca empire and the people who built Machu Picchu. The study’s findings are a reminder that the Incas were a powerful and sophisticated civilization that was able to achieve great things.

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