Embark on a journey through time as we uncover the enigmatic 6500-year-old tomb, crafted from seashells and sea antlers, offering a glimpse into a forgotten era

Téviec, an island located in Brittany, France, would go unnoticed if it weren’t for its remarkable archaeological significance due to the numerous discoveries made there, primarily from the Mesolithic Period. Among these findings are the remains of two women, dating between 6740 and 5680 BC, who may have been victims of violent acts.

A Grave of Seashells and Antlers: The 6500-Year-Old Resting Place of the Unfortunate Women of Téviec.

Téviec Earns Its Place on the Mesolithic Map

For the past 35 years, the island has been subject to a biotope protection program, making it challenging for contemporary archaeologists to access, as it is generally off-limits from April 15th to August 31st.

The Ladies of Téviec (Possibly Refugees of Doggerland): r/Archaeology

However, that wasn’t always the case. Between 1928 and 1934, archaeologists Marthe and Saint-Just Péquart discovered and excavated a culturally and archaeologically rich Mesolithic site on the island, dating between 5700 and 4500 BC.

A Grave of Seashells and Antlers: The 6500-Year-Old Resting Place of the Unfortunate Women of Téviec.

Unraveling the Meaning Behind the Ancient Tomb

According to most historians, this period is considered the transition from the Mesolithic to the Neolithic era in western France, marking a significant milestone in the region’s history.

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